Segments in this Video

Jewish Childhoods (06:07)

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Older Jewish people share stories about their childhoods throughout the world. Filmmaker Isaac Hertz wonders why he connected with people from his grandparents' generation more than his parents'. Writer Uri Orelv grew up in Warsaw in a family that displayed no Jewish beliefs at home.

Jewish Parents (05:28)

Older Jewish people share stories about their parents. Most remember their mothers having a dedication to education while their fathers were focused on work and religion. They remember their parents being loving and happy.

Jewish Practices (06:33)

Older Jewish people recall their families not being incredibly observant, but they conducted erev Shabbat every Friday. Food was always important, and most holidays were centered around family meals.

Jewish Students (06:03)

Jewish children traditional got a cone-shaped bag of candy on the first day of school. Older people remember their teachers being strict and focused on good behavior. Many of the Jewish students faced discrimination in public schools.

Jewish Traditions (02:51)

Many older Jewish men talk about their bar Mitzvah's being far less involved than modern ones. Some of their weddings were arranged by their parents.

Jewish Children in the 1930s (04:47)

Holocaust survivors share their memories of the rise of the Nazis and the start of World War II. Some lived in majority Jewish neighborhoods and were separated from the rising antisemitism. As violence increased, many families realized everything had changed.

Jewish Children During WWII (07:48)

Holocaust survivors recount their members of being kicked out of school. Others were relocated to ghettos and eventually taken to concentration camps. Many saw their parents for the last time at the gates of the camps.

Jewish Children During Liberation (02:03)

Holocaust survivors recount their memories of the day their concentration camps were liberated or abandoned by the Nazis. For many their religious belief was strengthened because they survived.

Jewish Children in Post-War Europe (08:57)

Holocaust survivors remember the strange feeling of returning home after the war to their destroyed communities. Many families immigrated to other countries, with many coming to the United States.

Credits: Life is Strange (02:35)

Credits: Life is Strange

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Life is Strange


DVD (Chaptered) Price: $169.95
DVD + 3-Year Streaming Price: $254.93
3-Year Streaming Price: $169.95

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Description

Life is Strange evokes the vibrant life of Jewish families in pre-World War II Europe through childhood memories of survivors. Intimate conversations with people from all walks of life are presented against a tapestry of rare footage that takes us into the heart of pre-war Yiddish culture.

Length: 54 minutes

Item#: FPT195788

ISBN: 978-1-64623-826-2

Copyright date: ©2012

Closed Captioned

Reviews & Awards

“Triumphs and joys register” – Los Angeles Times. “3.5 stars. Highly recommended” – Video Librarian

Performance Rights

Prices include public performance rights.

Not available to Home Video and Publisher customers.


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